Claims Officer II

Bahir Dar, Ethiopia Tsehay Insurance JOB REQUIREMENTSQualification: BA/BSC Degree in management, accounting, economics, computer science or related field.Work Experience:2 years of relevant experiencePlace of Work : Bahirdar BranchHOW TO APPLYInterested applicants, who fulfill the minimum requirements, can send their non-returnable application with CV and copies of relevant documents within 7 working days from the first date of this announcement to:Tsehay Insurance S.C.Manager, HR & Property AdministrationP.O.Box 56144Addis Ababa

See Job Detail or Apply

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

Country: Ethiopia
Organization: International Labour Organization
Closing date: 15 Oct 2020

TERMS OF REFERENCE

Consultation Service for Development of the draft AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers

Table of Contents

1. BACKGROUND.. 3

2. PROBLEM STATEMENT.. 5

3. JUSTIFICATION.. 9

4. OBJECTIVES.. 10

5. SCOPE OF WORK.. 10

5. EXPECTED RESULTS.. 11

6. ACTIVITIES, METHODOLOGY, DELIVERABLES AND TIMEFRAMES.. 12

7. REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS.. 14

8. CONSULTANTS’ PROFILE.. 14

1. BACKGROUND

The AUC wishes to develop in 2020 the “AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers” in consideration of the decisions of the AU Assembly that will be mentioned below and in accordance with global and continental policy frameworks.

The UN 2030 Agenda SDG’s 8 and 10 are of utmost importance to the significant number of low-skilled migrant workers in often exploitative working conditions and low-waged jobs, particularly in the case of migrant workers in an irregular situation working in the informal economy, many of whom are women. Labour exploitation limits migrant workers’ earnings and ability to contribute to the development of countries of origin and destination. The 2030 Agenda includes two main targets directly related to the improvement of the protection and the promotion of the rights of migrant workers: SDG target 8.8: “Protect labour rights and promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment”; and, SDG target 10.7: “Facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies”.

The AU’s Agenda 2063 adopted in 2015 calls for the free movement of people, capital, good and services, as part of Africa’s continental integration agenda. The free movement of persons is expected to contribute to growth in trade and investment among African countries and to strengthening Africa’s position in global trade. Agenda 2063 appeals for the mutual recognition of academic and professional qualifications across countries and should spur student and labour mobility. Agenda 2063 is an implementation framework for Africa’s transformative process for the next 50 years. It includes Aspiration 2 “An integrated continent, politically united and based on the ideals of Pan Africanism and vision of Africa’s Renaissance”, and Indicative National Strategies such as the following: Implement AU frameworks on Labour Migration Governance for Development and Integration.

At its Twenty-Fourth Ordinary Session, held from 30th–31st January 2015, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, the African Union (AU) Assembly of Heads of State by decision “Assembly/AU/Decl.6(XXIV)” reaffirmed its determination “to step up our regional cooperation for smooth labour migration in the continent, including through effective implementation of our treaties, charters, protocols and other relevant policy instruments in view of free movement of people and workers while combatting its negative impact on human trafficking”. In addition, the AU Assembly committed to implement the AUC’s Ouagadougou +10 Declaration on Employment, Poverty Eradication and Inclusive Development in Africa, which places labour migration and regional economic integration as one, and social protection as another of its six key priority policy areas.

It is also important to mention that in light of the challenges posed by labour migration governance, ten years after it was adopted, the AU commissioned an evaluation of the AU Migration Policy Framework for Africa (MPFA) in a bid to assess the usefulness and impact that the framework has had on migration management on the continent. The Revised AU MPFA and its Plan of Action (2018-2030) was adopted in 2018 and includes significant labour migration recommended strategies such as:

ü Meet labour market needs, develop tailored labour migration opportunities, including permanent, temporary and circular migration for diverse skills levels, and promote the integration of migrants into countries of destination”.

ü Facilitate family reunification.

ü Ensure the portability of social security.

ü Regulate recruiters and employers and ensure fair labour conditions.

ü Provide opportunities for regular migration, long-term residency and citizenship and efficient and affordable migration services.

ü Detect and prevent irregular migration.

ü Harmonise migration laws and policies across the regions to ensure effective migration governance[1].

Moreover, in order to facilitate the implementation of the Abuja Treaty, in 2018 the AU also embraced the Protocol to the Treaty Establishing the African Economic Community Relating to the Free movement of Persons, Right of Residence, and Right of Establishment Protocol which includes important labour migration provisions and fosters labour mobility in the continent.

Furthermore, in 2017 the AU assumed a Common African Position on the UN Global Compact on Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) with the purpose of ensuring that “Africa’s narratives and priorities would be adequately reflected in the global compact for migration”[2]. In 2019, the AU agreed on a 3-Year Plan of Action for the implementation of the GCM in Africa (2020-2022) which includes GCM Priority 4 “Facilitating regular migration, decent work and enhancing the positive development effects of human mobility” as well as the following objective: Skills development, labor mobility and decent work is promoted through social dialogue and other inclusive processes.

The AU decided in 2015 that the Joint Labour Migration Governance for Development and Integration Programme (JLMP) would be considered as a significant continental implementing tool in its work on international migration. The JLMP is a long-term joint undertaking among the African Union, the International Labour Organization (ILO), the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the UN Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) in coordination with other relevant partners operating in Africa, development cooperation actors, private sector, workers and employers’ organizations and civil society representatives. The overall objective of the JLMP is to strengthen the effective governance and regulation of labour migration and mobility in Africa, under the rule of law and with the involvement of key stakeholders across government such as Regional Economic Communities and labour market institutions.

In order to ensure strong take off the JLMP a Three Year Project (2018-2021), the JLMP Priority, is developed with the overall objective to improve the governance of labour migration to achieve safe, orderly and regular migration in Africa as committed in relevant frameworks of the African Union (AU) and Regional Economic Commissions (RECs), as well as relevant international human rights and labour standards and other cooperation processes. The JLMP Priority prioritizes four specific objectives closely drawn from the JLMP:

Outcome 1: Enhanced effectiveness and transparency of operations of labour migration stakeholders, such as labour market actors and institutions, migration authorities, in consultation and cooperation with workers and employers’ organizations, the private sector, recruitment industry and relevant civil society organizations, in delivering improved labour migration governance services.

Outcome 2: Improved policy and regulatory systems on labour migration at Member State and REC levels, considering its gender dimension and the relevant international human rights and labour standards.

Outcome 3: Multi-stakeholder policy consultation and practical coordination on labour migration and mobility to provide advisory support to MSs’, AU’s and REC’s decision makers; and

Outcome 4: Continental and regional operational leadership and capacity to spearhead/steer the implementation of the JLMP at all levels.

The JLMP-Priority Project (2018-2021) will be providing support to the AUC in the preparation of the “AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers” as a strategy aimed at improving policy and regulatory systems on labour migration at the continental, regional (RECs) and Member States’ levels.

2. PROBLEM STATEMENT

Increasing cross-border labour and skills mobility has made labour migration an ever more urgent challenge for governance across Africa. The large majority of migrant workers go abroad with the purpose of finding a job and better wages. Some of the most important migration push factors in Africa include demographic pressure, political instability, poverty and wide income inequalities, military conflict, terrorism, corruption, lack of respect for the rule of law, poor governance, and environmental degradation causing draughts, deforestation, etc. Indeed, the lack of job-rich growth translates into large numbers of young Africans taking a decision to migrate within Africa, as toward other continents where ageing populations and declining workforces result in labour shortages in several economic sectors and occupations.

Intra-African migration flows remain overwhelmingly significant and occur largely between neighbouring countries. Indeed, more than 80% of migration flows of African nationals take place within the African continent[3]. This is partly due to the fact that there are cooperation agreements in some of the economic communities which uphold the free movement of people and their freedom of establishment among other factors like the continent’s population growth, the age structure of the population and individual countries’ policies on the movement of people. The trend of international migration has increased significantly in Africa in the last decade. In 2017, the number of international migrants in the continent was reported to be 25.4 million, with an annual growth rate of 7.5 percent. The working age migrant population was 19.7 million out of which 14.4 million were migrant workers in the year 20174. It was evident that the number of migrant workers within the continent is increasing at 7.5 percent annually, which is more than the annual increase in the labour force in the continent. In 2017, the leading countries of destination for migrants were South Africa which accounts for 16.5 per cent of the total migrant population in Africa, Côte d’Ivoire (8.9 per cent), Uganda (6.9 per cent), Nigeria (5.0 per cent), Ethiopia (5.0 per cent) and Kenya (4.4 per cent).

Various Regional Economic Communities (RECs) have been created for the purpose of removing barriers to trade and the free movement of goods, capital, and people; between their Member States.[4] However, the rights of migrants, including the migrant workers, are not always protected; particularly in times of economic crisis, migrants are often scapegoated and subjected to mass deportations.[5] In 2019, the world witness xenophobia situations that took place in South Africa on migrants especially labour migrants. Additionally, challenges of intra African migration attribute to restrictions imposed by some Member States within the same REC. For example, South Africa still restricts migration from other SADC Countries.[6] For migrants in the ECOWAS, they resort to using smugglers in order avoid harassment, extortion and payment of bribery to the border guards and other state officials.[7]

Since the 1980s there has also been an important increase in the diversification of migration and mobility inter-continental outflows to Europe, Gulf Cooperation and Middle East countries, North America, Oceania and other destinations. Lately, labour migration outflows of African nationals are rapidly growing towards Gulf Cooperation Council and Middle East countries. The majority of African workers who migrate to the Middle East are young and low-skilled. Men migrant workers are mostly engaged in construction work and women migrant workers in domestic work although they are also present in the hospitality, security and cleaning sectors. The composition of migrant workers is also becoming more feminized due to the high demand for work for women originating mainly from East Africa and English-speaking West Africa.

In the Asia and Pacific, the region has adopted the Bali Declaration. The Bali Declaration was adopted at the 16th Asia and Pacific Regional Meeting of the ILO on 9 December 2016. The Declaration serves as a call to action for governments, workers’ and employers’ organizations in the region to do more to promote inclusive growth, social justice and decent work. It calls for provision of adequate protection to all migrant workers, including through better portability of skills and social security benefits; redress employer-worker relationship that impede workers’ freedom of movement, their right to terminate employment/ change employers, and return freely to their countries of origin. Additionally, it requests for provision of measures closing gender gaps in opportunity and treatment at work through promotion of equal pay for work of equal value; extended maternity protection measures and measures enabling women and men to balance work and care responsibilities. Moreover, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers was adopted by the ASEAN heads of state in Cebu, Philippines in 2007. The Declaration calls on countries of origin and destination to ensure the dignity of migrant workers by outlining their obligations in the areas of: (i) protection from exploitation, discrimination, and violence; (ii) labour migration governance; and (iii) the fight against trafficking in persons.

During the 5th Abu Dhabi Dialogue Ministerial Consultation in October 2019, the meeting adopted the Dubai Declaration calling for use of technology and recruitment to promote compliant and transparent labour recruitment and placement practices, skilling, skill certification and mutual recognition as well as addressing opportunities and challenges associated with future of work in the region. In addition, the meeting agreed on the development of core Domestic Worker Competency Standards and the promotion of inter-regional cooperation to contribute to global dialogues on labour mobility.

The most significant challenges faced by African migrant workers (particularly low-skilled and women) and their family members, within and from Africa, include the following:

ü Lack of respect for the human and labour rights of migrant workers.

ü Weakness and limited capacity of labour market institutions on labour migration governance and administration.

ü The rise in irregular migration flows with women and girls particularly exposed to serious decent work deficits, often including forced and child labour situations, as well as sexual abuse and exploitation.

ü The predominant position of many countries of destination that consider all migrants as a potential security threat and emphasize border-control and national security issues. This dominance of security concerns often puts at risk the protection and rights of migrant workers and could have a negative impact on labour market integration and the free movement of persons within African Regional Economic Communities (RECs).

ü The rise of discrimination, including racism, xenophobia and intolerance.

ü Weak social dialogue on labour migration including Ministries of Labour and social partners, particularly within Regional Economic Commissions (RECs) at the national, but also bilateral, sub-regional and regional level.

ü Abusive and exploitative working conditions including long working hours and non-payment of wages or payment of meager wages.

ü Poor social security coverage of migrant workers,

ü Lack of recognition and portability of skills.

ü Lack of access to justice.

ü Deficient knowledge-base on labour migration as well as data collection and analysis - According to the JLMP, most Member States of African RECs lack comprehensive information on labour migration, migrant workers and labour markets, together with little or no data on migrants’ skills and employment profiles, labour market participation, conditions of work and social protection coverage.

ü High costs of remittances’ transfer.

ü Different minimum wages being set or negotiated for migrant workers, depending on country of origin.

ü High costs of recruitment fees exposing migrants to situation of forced labour/bounded labour including unfair and sometimes illegal practices of the private placement agencies, the absence of regulation or the absence or enforcement of the regulation applicable to private placement agencies.

Recently, the African Union Labour Migration Advisory Committee8 made a very strong statement[9] on the novel Coronavirus Disease COVID-19 and the condition of African Migrant Workers (published 14th April 2020). The Statement calls on RECs, African States and social partners to consider and implement comprehensive policy responses ensuring that migrant workers’ rights, including social protection rights, are protected. Following LMAC’s call, the Commission has started discussions with Ambassadors from several GCC and Middle East countries with the aim of improving the protection of African migrant workers in the Arab States.

The AU Revised Migration Policy Framework (MPFA) rightly recognized that “migration will be a major topic in the 21st Century and will therefore pose certain social, economic and political challenges for policy makers in the future management of migration for the betterment of African societies”. Reports of labour and other rights abuse of migrant workers, incidences of xenophobic attacks on migrants, and arbitrary expulsions highlight the challenges of realizing decent work, equality of treatment and protection of human (including labour) rights according to the standards many African states have ratified. The MPFA calls for the ratification and domestication of all the International Labour Organisation (ILO) Conventions on labour migration as appropriate to each Member State and for the harmonisation of national laws and regulations with international labour standards. It also calls for the provision of access to accurate information on labour migration at pre-departure and post-arrival stages, including terms and conditions of work, remedies and access to legal advice in the event of violations. The African Union’s aim is to improve the protection of migrant workers and their family members, ensure their human and labour rights are respected and disseminate information about them. This necessitates from countries of origin and destination in Africa to strengthen their commitments for the protection and promotion of migrant workers to address the challenges that migrant workers face in Africa.

3. JUSTIFICATION

The AU Revised Migration Policy Framework provides a guidance framework on international migration and includes an important section on labour migration. In addition, the Protocol to the Treaty Establishing the African Economic Community Relating to the Free movement of Persons, Right of Residence, and Right of Establishment includes significant labour migration provisions which were extensively explained in the related Guidelines (2019). Moreover, the Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) addresses trade in services (for example, consultants, doctors, lawyers etc) and various AU human rights legal instruments generally play a vital role in the protection and promotion of migrant rights in Africa. For example, the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights (also known as the Banjul Charter) promotes and protects human rights and basic freedoms in the African continent. The treaty covers economic, social and cultural rights, as well as civil and political rights and it confers rights upon peoples and not only individuals.

ILO international standards on labour migration also play an imperative role in the protection of migrant workers. Their ratification by AU Member States is set to improve the protection of the rights of migrant workers and provide a rights-based ground for effective advocacy. A table of status of ratification of key standards is attached as an annex to the TORs.

The main purposes of the AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of African Migrant Workers will be:

  1. To contribute to meeting the labour migration-related goals and targets outlined in the 2030 Agenda and Africa’s Agenda 2063, and the realization of the 3-Year Plan of Action for the implementation of the UN Global Compact on Safe, Orderly and Regional Migration in Africa (2020-2022), as well as the implementation of labour migration provisions included in the AU Revised Migration Policy Framework, and the AU Free movement of Persons, Right of Residence, and Right of Establishment Protocol.

  2. To contribute to improving inter-continental and intra-African labour migration governance for development and integration through improved international cooperation and other means.

  3. To state common agreed principles and mechanisms on the protection and promotion of the human and labour rights of African migrant workers and their family members and a harmonized approach, to labour migration governance among and between the AU Member States and the RECs.

  4. To foster an African common position on the protection and promotion of the rights of migrant workers and members of their family and to commit AU Member States and the RECs to pledge to guarantee them.

  5. To improve the harmonization between AU treaties and the different RECs on the continent in relation to labour migration governance in Africa - thereby enhancing national planning processes and developing synergies across policy and legal frameworks.

4. OBJECTIVES

The overall objective of the consultancy is to develop a Draft AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of African Migrant Workers participating in inter-and intra-continental labour migration flows.

The specific objectives include the following:

1) Identification, review and analysis of international policy and legal instruments, including international labour standards, to extract elements related to the protection and promotion of African migrant workers’ human and labour rights.

2) Identification, review and analysis of existing AU and other continental and RECs policy and legal instruments related to the protection and promotion of African migrant workers’ human and labour rights.

3) Identification of institutional and general governance gaps and challenges in African migrant workers’ protection in Intra and Inter-regional migration corridors, that take into account the specific gender dimensions

4) Developing a Draft AU Declaration that will provide for common agreed principles regarding the protection and the promotion of the rights of African migrant workers and their family members.

5. SCOPE OF WORK

Pursuant to the objectives outlined in above, the AU desires to engage a Consultant to develop a proposal for a draft Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of African Migrant Workers through a wider process of consultations. Drawing on lessons learned from the various researches on labour migration, the consultant shall develop a draft AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of African Migrant Workers.

The proposed draft Declaration shall be drafted in line with the existing global and continental legal instruments and policy frameworks on human and labour rights of migrant workers and paying particular attention to the gaps in migrant protection, as identified in the preceding analysis.**

Expected Deliverables: The following deliverables are expected.

1) An inception report that provides the consultant’s understanding of the assignment, its scope, and the activities and respective methodologies that will be pursued, accompanied by a financial proposal. The inception report will provide AUC, IOM and ILO the opportunity to verify that they share the same understanding about the project objectives, and how it will be achieved.

2) A Proposal for the Development of AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion on the Rights of Migrant Workers that will be used for consultations and lobbying of Member States and the RECs to develop a Declaration.

3) Reports from all Meetings.

4) The Final version of the A Proposal for the Development of AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion on the Rights of Migrant Workers that is ready to be submitted to the Specialized Technical Committee on Social Development, Labour and Employment in 2021.

5) Draft AU Declaration on the on the Protection and Promotion on the Rights of Migrant Workers.

5. EXPECTED RESULTS

It is expected that the intervention will contribute to enhanced labour migration governance in the continent.

6. ACTIVITIES, METHODOLOGY, DELIVERABLES, TIMEFRAMES, PARTNER AGENCY AND SOURCE OF FUNDING

In view of the Scope of Work and Expected Results as presented above, the following activities (and attendant deliverables) are envisaged. It is expected that the process will be participatory, involving all relevant stakeholders during the various phases.

Developing a draft AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers

ACTIVITY: Activity 1: Drafting of the Inception Report

METHODOLOGY: Desk Review

DELIVERABLES: Draft Inception Report

TIMEFRAME / NO OF DAYS: 7 days

PARTNER AGENCY: AUC, IOM, ILO, ECA

SOURCE OF FUNDING: ILO

ACTIVITY: Activity 2: Review and adoption of the Inception Report

METHODOLOGY: Desk Review

DELIVERABLES: Inception Report

TIMEFRAME / NO OF DAYS: 7 days

PARTNER AGENCY: AUC, IOM, ILO, ECA

SOURCE OF FUNDING: ILO

ACTIVITY: Activity 3: Drafting the Proposal for the Development of the AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers

METHODOLOGY: i) Desk review of relevant reports/literature on the subject matter.

ii) Consultations with AUC, IOM and ILO (JLMP team)

DELIVERABLES: i) Proposal for Developing AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers. ii) Reports of the meetings. iii) Updated Proposal for Developing AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers ready to be used for consultations.

TIMEFRAME / NO OF DAYS: 3 Weeks

PARTNER AGENCY: AUC, IOM, ILO, ECA

SOURCE OF FUNDING: ILO

ACTIVITY: Activity 4: Consultations on the Proposal for Developing AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers.

METHODOLOGY: Virtual Consultative meetings with relevant stakeholders:

a) Member States

b) RECsLMAC

c) PAP

d) Partners; IOM, ILO, UNDP etc

e) Social Partners and other levant stakeholders such as migrants’ associations; Private Recruitment Agencies, Organization of African Trade Union Unity (OATUU), ITUC-AFRICA and other organisations dealing with the rights of migrant workers and the employers.

f) Social Partners and other levant stakeholders such as migrants’ associations; Private Recruitment Agencies, Organization of African Trade Union Unity (OATUU), ITUC-AFRICA and other organisations dealing with the rights of migrant workers and the employers.

g) Civil Society Organisations working on labour migration

DELIVERABLES: i) ) Reports of the meetings. ii)Draft AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers.

TIMEFRAME / NO OF DAYS: 60 days

PARTNER AGENCY: AUC, IOM, ILO, ECA

SOURCE OF FUNDING: ILO

ACTIVITY: Activity 5: Validation of the Draft AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers.

METHODOLOGY:

a) Member States

b) RECS

c) PAP

d) Social Partners

DELIVERABLES: Draft AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers to be submitted to the STC on Social Development, Labour and Employment for adoption

TIMEFRAME / NO OF DAYS: 2 Weeks

PARTNER AGENCY: AUC, IOM, ILO, ECA

SOURCE OF FUNDING: ILO

ACTIVITY: Activity 6: Submission of the Draft AU Declaration the STC on Social Development, Labour and Employment for adoption.

METHODOLOGY: Presentation before the STC

DELIVERABLES: Presentation of the Draft AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers

TIMEFRAME / NO OF DAYS: May 2021

PARTNER AGENCY: AUC

SOURCE OF FUNDING: AUC

7. Duration

This activity is expected to take 4 months, expected to be concluded on February 28 , 2021

**

Foot Notes:

[1] African Union: Migration Policy Framework for Africa and Plan of Action (2018-2030), 2017, p.13-14.

[2] African Union, United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, the IOM: African Regional Consultative Meeting on the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration- Recommendations, Addis Ababa, 26 and 27 October 2017, p.2.

[3] Flahaux, Marie-Laurence, de Haas, Hein: African migration: trends, patterns, drivers, Comparative Migration Studies, 2016.

[4] The Arab Maghreb Union (AMU), the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), the Southern African Development Community (SDAC), the East African Community (EAC), and the Common Market for East and Southern Africa (COMESA)

[5] Castles, Stephen, de Haas, Hein and Miller J. Mark: The Age of Migration. International Population Movements in the Modern World. 5thed.

[6] Ibid.

[7] de Haas, Hein. International migration and national development: Viewpoints and policy initiatives in countries of origin- The case of Nigeria, 2006

[8] The African Labour Migration Advisory Committee (LMAC) was established in 2018 as a tripartite structure to further enhance coordination and cooperation on labour migration on the continent, with the overarching goal to promote and protect the rights of migrant workers and members of their families. The LMAC was called upon in the AU Plan of Action on Employment, Poverty Eradication and Inclusive Development and initiated within the ambit of the JLMP. The LMAC membership includes representatives of all the RECs, the employers’ and workers’ organizations, academia, diaspora organizations, the Pan African Parliament, ECOSOCC, ILO, IOM and the ECA.

[9] https://au.int/en/pressreleases/20200414/statement-lmac-condition-african-migrant-workers-covid-19


**


**

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

Within the context of the above, the ILO invites interested and qualified individual and firm of consultants to submit expressions of interest for the provision of services to the development of a proposal for a draft AU Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers.

Proposals should include a technical and a financial proposal.

The Technical Proposal should include the following information:

i) The individual and/or firm of consultants’ understanding of the assignment;

ii) A conceptual framework, detailed methodology and work-plan (with timeframes) for all activities, including travel (if circumstances will permit);

iii) Capability Statement and CVs of the consultant(s);

iv) Two writing samples of the individual or firm of consultants on similar assignments.

The Financial Proposal should include:

i) Budget with a detailed breakdown of costs (including travel costs; in case circumstances permit) for the implementation of activities.

1. CONSULTANTS’ PROFILE

It is expected that the assignment will be conducted by a consultant. The criteria for selecting the consultant are as follows:

Academic Qualifications

i) Master’s degree in the field of law, human rights, international relations, migration or related field.

Technical experience/competencies

i) Minimum international work experience of 5 – 10 years.

ii) Demonstrable technical experience in legal research in the area of labour migration, mixed migration and human mobility, as well as gender and migration.

iii) In-depth knowledge of contemporary migration dynamics / migration and development issues, as well as its gender dimensions, in Africa.

iv) Proven previous working experience consisting of substantial involvement in assessments, evaluations, policy and/or treaty formulation and/or reviews in related areas.

v) In-depth knowledge of migration governance as well as issues of labour migration,

vi) Knowledge of international human rights instruments and international labour standards relevant to migrant workers, and the recommendations and comments of related supervisory bodies.

vii) Knowledge of global, continental and regional policies, and initiatives regarding labour migration, migration and mobility.

viii) Demonstrable experience in legal research and drafting in/on Africa will be an advantage.

ix) Possession of strong drafting skills; and

x) Previous working experience with the AUC, the UN (in general) and the IOM and ILO in particular.

Language: Fluency in English and French is required, and knowledge of other AU languages would be a strong asset.

Other skills/competencies

i) Experience in similar assignments would be an added advantage.

ii) Experience and ability to interact with AUC, ILO, IOM, Member States, the RECs and other related stakeholders.

iii) Experience and ability to navigate political processes in highly sensitive settings.

iv) Excellent drafting/writing and analytical skills.

v) Strong interpersonal, networking and presentation skills.

How to apply:

**

Proposals should be addressed to:

Silvia Cormaci- ILO JLMP Manager; cormaci@ilo.org and Oumar Diop – JLMP Coordinator; DiopO@africa-union.org. The closing date for submission of proposals is 15 October 2020.**



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